Week of August 1st – 7th

We welcomed Onalaska Cross Country, Planned Parenthood Teen Council, Scheels Gun University, Westwood Hills Nature Center, Decorah High School Football, Stringwood Adults, and Girl Scout Troop 50408.

The Onalaska Cross Country Team came to Eagle Bluff on Monday and stayed through Wednesday. While they were here, they did a lot of running as well as Group Challenges and East Treetops.

The Planned Parenthood Teen Council arrived on Tuesday for an overnight visit. While they were here, they had some group time as well as  Group Challenges and East Treetops.

Scheels employees came out to Eagle Bluff for the week and held their Scheels Gun University. They tested out different guns at our 3 different ranges to boost their knowledge and make them better salesmen of the products.

Westwood Hills Nature Center brought a group of 6th – 8th graders on Wednesday for camp. They were able to experience Canoeing, Rock Climbing, Stream Lab, and East Treetops before leaving on Friday.

The Decorah High School Football Team came on Wednesday for Group Challenges.

Stringwood Adults came to Eagle Bluff to rehearse.

Girl Scout Troop 50408 arrived on Friday night for a weekend visit. They took GPS Pathfinders, Group Challenges, Rock Climbing, and South Treetops while they were here.

 

Phenology

  • The Minnesota DNR came out on Wednesday and did a Mussel survey on Eagle Bluff’s section of the Root River. While they didn’t find any live mussels, they did find shells of Elktoe and Fluted-shell Mussels.

    Shell of a Fluted-shell Mussel

  • The Eagle Bluff garden is growing and producing Peppers, Tomatoes, and Summer Squash!
  • Butterfly Weed is in bloom.
  • Blazing Star is also in bloom.

 

Thought for the Week

“Birds sing after a storm; why shouldn’t people feel as free to delight in whatever remains to them?”
Rose Kennedy

 

Nature Trivia Question

Answer to Last Week’s Question:
Cedar Waxwings get their name from the waxy red secretions found on the tips of secondaries of some of the birds. Scientists do not yet definitively know the function of the tips, but they may help attract mates.

This Week’s Question:
What do Mussels eat?

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